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Why Fixing Bad N.A.P. Data Issues Sucks

August 25th, 2014

Nyagoslav (think Cher, Michael, Brittany, etc.) gets all OCD on my recent post where I used our NAP Hunter extension to surface some bogus N.A.P. data issues. He really peels back the rotten onion:

“The NPI registry is one of the most trustworthy data sources in the medical industry, so the chances that this was the initial source of the bad data are very high. What is of particular interest is the fact that the NPI record was last updated on December 15, 2011, more than two and a half years ago, and there are still listings online that feature that outdated information.”

and

“Since I know that Citysearch gets data from InfoGroup, this lead me to guess that there was a listing on Infogroup that might have featured the incorrect information, but had been updated at some point in the past on ExpressUpdate.com. And, if so, it’s possible that the data made its way to Google via Infogroup, which is an official data partner of Google.

But I was left with the remaining questions:

  1. Where did Infogroup get the data from?
  2. Where did Factual get the data from?”

I have four reactions to Nyago’s work:

  1. I agree that my superficial analysis may not have solved the mystery
  2. While InfoGroup and Acxiom may have direct feeds into Google, Nyago does not take into account that Google’s crawlers may have found the data on its own from any number of sources and taken it as the source of truth. Only Google knows for sure at this point.
  3. Solving problems with bad N.A.P. data sucks. It’s the equivalent of taking a pork chop to a gun fight.
  4. Nyago should seek professional help for his unhealthy obsession. I am thinking a G+ Hangout Intervention this Wednesday at 11am PT. + me if you’re in.

→ 11 CommentsTags: Local Data
Posted by Andrew Shotland

Do HTTPS URLs Impact SEO?

August 25th, 2014

A couple of weeks ago Google announced that it would be using HTTPS URLs as a “lightweight ranking signal”. I have not switched any sites yet, but I thought it would be interesting to observe what has happened to client sites that were already using HTTPS URLs.

I took out a few outliers – one site had a lot of publicity, another implemented some SEO upgrades – but the rest had not done anything out of the ordinary to make their traffic go one way or another. There also may be some seasonality at play, but six out of nine HTTPS sites are on their way up.  It’s also interesting that most of the “product” e-commerce sites are down while “service” e-commerce sites are up.

So the answer is…maybe.

Google Traffic to HTTPs Sites 8/3-8/23 v 7/13-8/2

Directory Site: Up 40% From Small Base
Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 9.50.38 PM

Service E-Commerce Site: Up 14%
Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 10.14.11 PM

Travel Site: Up 9%
Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 9.56.52 PM

Service E-Commerce Site: Up 5% After Flat For 2 Months
Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 9.49.23 PM

Service E-Commerce Site: Up 4% After Flat for 1 Month
Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 9.52.52 PM

Clothing E-Commerce: Up 3%

Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 10.03.46 PM

Product E-Commerce Site: Down 1% But Trending Upwards Since 8/3
Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 9.43.45 PM

Food E-Commerce: Down 3%
Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 10.02.31 PM

Clothing E-Commerce Site: Down 4%
Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 10.13.05 PM

 

→ 8 CommentsTags: Technical SEO
Posted by Andrew Shotland

Google Local Desktop SERPs Continue To Get More Mobile

August 18th, 2014

Seems like every day we stumble onto a new Google Pigeon test bucket.  Here’s a desktop SERP for “ft. lauderdale movers” that looks pretty mobilicious:

Ft. Lauderdale Movers

When you click on the “More movers” link (which had disappeared in a lot of post-Pigeon SERPs), you get another mobile-looking ordered list:

More Movers

And of course it’s full of Pigeon Poop SPAM.

We’re also seeing a service radius in the Knowledge Graph box for one of the listings. Don’t recall seeing that before:  (As Linda points out in the comments, this has been around for a while. Didn’t have my coffee yet when I posted.)

Service Area Local Knowledge Graph

Anyone else seeing these or other variations?

*Update - 

When you click on one of the tiles in the pack it does a branded + geo search like in the screenshot below:

New pack results trigger a branded + geo search

→ 7 CommentsTags: Google Pigeon Poop
Posted by Andrew Shotland

Google Local Icons & New Real Estate Snippets Spotted

August 12th, 2014

As Google morphs SERP design from desktop to mobile, it appears that it has decided that reading words is perhaps too much to ask of our educationally-challenged fellow users. And so it is now testing icons in the mobile results as shown below:

Google Local Icons

I guess it’s easier to click on a cute picture than try to read text while you’re driving right?

Rivers Pearce of Boomtown ROI just sent me this screenshot. It’s from results from the iOS Google Search App. The “Send to Mobile Phone” and “Driving Directions” icons appear next to a personalized result (but they are not clickable so WTF?). Angela Tice of Boomtown is in River’s G+ circle and had posted a link to LiveLoveMaryland.com on G+, so the icons may be triggered by the G+ connection and/or the implementation of Schema.org markup and/or Live Love Maryland’s Google My Business Page.

We are also seeing open house times and location snippets appear with real estate aggregator results in the SERPs. I have not seen that one before:

Real Estate Snippets

It’s getting interesting out there folks…

→ 4 CommentsTags: Google · Google Maps
Posted by Andrew Shotland

Paid Local Pack Results?

August 12th, 2014

Our friends over at Moz saw a new SERP feature pop up in their MozCast.

Paid Local Pack?

Notice the lovely paid ads dressed up as a local pack result? While this is a test, and nothing but a test, is it also a continued acknowledgement from Google that their current methods of dealing with Local search results suck? Or maybe it’s an acknowledgement that local data sucks and Google isn’t making enough money from local to throw serious resources into attempting to crack that nut.

→ 6 CommentsTags: Google
Posted by Dan Leibson